In This Issue
President's Message:
Busy Year Ahead
Minneapolis 'Get Your Rear in Gear' Event Raises $200,000
Society Extends CBS HealthWatch™ Campaign

Jagelman, Monahan Awards Honor Advocacy, Awareness Efforts

Dr. David Beck Elected ASCRS President
Presidential Address: Emotional Intelligence Critical Part of Professionalism

Dr. Patricia Roberts Honored with Mentor Award

National Media Award Winners

International Scholar Report:
Prof. James O’Riordan

Socioeconomic Update

International Scholar Report:
Dr. Martin Hübner

Society Thanks Corporate Supporters

DC&R Enjoys Another Successful Year

Vancouver to Host 2011 Meeting

Committee Chairs
Society Welcomes New Members
President's Message:
Busy Year Ahead
Dr. David Beck Elected ASCRS President

Jagelman, Monahan Awards Honor Advocacy, Awareness Efforts

National Media Award Winners

Presidential Address: Emotional Intelligence Critical Part of Professionalism

Dr. Patricia Roberts Honored with Mentor Award

Society Thanks Corporate Supporters

Vancouver to Host 2011 Meeting

DC&R Enjoys Another Successful Year
Socioeconomic Update

International Scholar Report:
Dr. Martin Hübner

International Scholar Report:
Prof. James O’Riordan

Society Welcomes New Members
Committee Chairs
Minneapolis 'Get Your Rear in Gear' Event Raises $200,000
Society Extends CBS HealthWatch™ Campaign
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In This Issue
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Annual Meeting Information
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ASCRS Website
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ASCRS Research Foundation
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ASCRS Facebook Page

 

 

 

 

Emotional intelligence critical part of professionalism,
Dr. Fleshman says

Dr. James Fleshman addresses Society membersDr. James Fleshman addresses Society members.

Emotional intelligence that springs from concern for humanity is a critical component of professionalism, outgoing ASCRS President Dr. James W. Fleshman said in his presidential address, “The Impact of Professionalism.”

Emotional intelligence includes self-awareness and social awareness. “In today’s world, adherence to the ‘code of behavior’ in the workplace has become mandatory.  Learning or developing emotional intelligence can help us become better physicians, mentors, and colleagues, even as pressures increase to be more productive and remove our independence,” he said.

Dr. Fleshman drew heavily on the thoughts and words of 100 past presidents, going back to the Society’s first president, Dr. Joseph Mathews, for his outline of professionalism.  He quoted from the 1991 presidential address of Dr. Peter Volpe: “Professionalism always implies a specialized body of knowledge, a code of ethics, and an overall responsibility to society to serve the public trust….Professionalism demands a societal responsibility, a contribution beyond the practice of the profession per se, by involvement with the community at large.”

 

Here are some highlights from Dr. Fleshman’s very thoughtful and wide-ranging address.

  • On the importance of the Society’s new partnership with the National Institutes of Health:  “Only as we develop young basic scientists dedicated to basic research in colorectal disease will we be able to claim our position as ‘the’ authority in colorectal disease.  These members or fellows, who are devoting their lives to the process of basic discovery, represent the future for our position at the forefront of patient care.”
  • Why ASCRS has established a New Technology Committee, headed by Dr. Peter Marcello:  “Professionalism dictates that we evaluate all new technology critically before recommending use by our members.  This evaluation process within the confines of conflict of interest, informed consent, and the institutional review process must be complete before members endorse the new technology as experts.”
  • On relationships with industry:  “Disclosure of relationships with industry does not eliminate conflict of interest nor does it necessarily indicate conflict of interest….Our policies of complete control of educational content in all of our meetings will be maintained.”
  • Creating a social contract between a group and the public it serves:  “This can only be accomplished if the populace is fully aware of the group, its members, and its goals.  In that vein, efforts are underway to improve our visibility in the eyes of the public, and organized medicine.  This branding effort was initiated at this meeting….as we seek to raise the level of visibility at each successive venue for this meeting.”
  • On the work of the Operative Competency Evaluation Committee, under Dr. Patricia Roberts, to develop a method for evaluating operative skills during colon and rectal residency:  “Standardization of procedural-based assessment tools and a simulated summative skills test may help us shorten and improve our training simultaneously.  This is a cutting edge experiment that the ASCRS is funding.  If successful, it will propel us to the forefront of competency-based certification and provide the ABCRS with a modernized method of certifying new colon and rectal surgeons.”

He concluded: “The impact of professionalism is the legacy that each of us leaves behind—selfless contribution that makes a difference, in the form of friends, grateful trainees, grateful patients, and an altogether better practice of colorectal surgery, community, society, and worl….We must never sacrifice our professionalism; rather, we must hold up our professionalism as our battle flag to motivate others to follow us as we move to a better world for our patients.”